The Tarot Nook
Professional Tarot Readings by Kelsey Lynore
The Tarot Nook
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fridaynightgallery:

Mushrooms and fungi -all coloured and complete
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obeytheprophecy:

▲ obey the prophecy ▲ the door to wonderland
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"He who jumps into the void owes no explanation to those who stand and watch."

Jean-Luc Godard  (via violentwavesofemotion)

Badasssssss

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artizan3:

Stas Kadrulev
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"Most people die at 25 and aren’t buried until they’re 75."
Benjamin Franklin  (via sundryedtomatos)
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atalantaproductions:

White Short Sleeve Rainbow Horse Print T-Shirt - Sheinside.com
http://ift.tt/1pmsE89
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fitter-stoke:

Statuette of a naked woman, maybe the Great Goddess of Babylon (or Ishtar). From the necropolis of Hillah, near Babylon.
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free-parking:

Paintings by Hilma af Klint (1862-1944)

Five years before Wassily Kandinsky (he of the book Concerning the Spiritual In Art, 1910), before Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich, before the images of Carl Jung and Rudolf Steiner—who dismissed her ideas as wrong—was this revolutionary artist and abstractionist, Hilma af Klint, possibly the first purely abstract painter to produced non-objective works in the early 1900s.
Hilma af Klint was influenced by contemporary spiritual movements, such as spiritism, theosophy and, later, anthroposophy. Her oeuvre builds on the awareness of a spiritual dimension of consciousness, an aspect that was being marginalised in an increasingly materialistic world. When she painted, she believed that a higher consciousness was speaking through her. In her astonishing works she combines geometric shapes and symbols with ornamentation. Her multifaceted imagery strives to give insights into the different dimensions of existence, where microcosm and macrocosm reflect one another.
free-parking:

Paintings by Hilma af Klint (1862-1944)

Five years before Wassily Kandinsky (he of the book Concerning the Spiritual In Art, 1910), before Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich, before the images of Carl Jung and Rudolf Steiner—who dismissed her ideas as wrong—was this revolutionary artist and abstractionist, Hilma af Klint, possibly the first purely abstract painter to produced non-objective works in the early 1900s.
Hilma af Klint was influenced by contemporary spiritual movements, such as spiritism, theosophy and, later, anthroposophy. Her oeuvre builds on the awareness of a spiritual dimension of consciousness, an aspect that was being marginalised in an increasingly materialistic world. When she painted, she believed that a higher consciousness was speaking through her. In her astonishing works she combines geometric shapes and symbols with ornamentation. Her multifaceted imagery strives to give insights into the different dimensions of existence, where microcosm and macrocosm reflect one another.
free-parking:

Paintings by Hilma af Klint (1862-1944)

Five years before Wassily Kandinsky (he of the book Concerning the Spiritual In Art, 1910), before Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich, before the images of Carl Jung and Rudolf Steiner—who dismissed her ideas as wrong—was this revolutionary artist and abstractionist, Hilma af Klint, possibly the first purely abstract painter to produced non-objective works in the early 1900s.
Hilma af Klint was influenced by contemporary spiritual movements, such as spiritism, theosophy and, later, anthroposophy. Her oeuvre builds on the awareness of a spiritual dimension of consciousness, an aspect that was being marginalised in an increasingly materialistic world. When she painted, she believed that a higher consciousness was speaking through her. In her astonishing works she combines geometric shapes and symbols with ornamentation. Her multifaceted imagery strives to give insights into the different dimensions of existence, where microcosm and macrocosm reflect one another.
free-parking:

Paintings by Hilma af Klint (1862-1944)

Five years before Wassily Kandinsky (he of the book Concerning the Spiritual In Art, 1910), before Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich, before the images of Carl Jung and Rudolf Steiner—who dismissed her ideas as wrong—was this revolutionary artist and abstractionist, Hilma af Klint, possibly the first purely abstract painter to produced non-objective works in the early 1900s.
Hilma af Klint was influenced by contemporary spiritual movements, such as spiritism, theosophy and, later, anthroposophy. Her oeuvre builds on the awareness of a spiritual dimension of consciousness, an aspect that was being marginalised in an increasingly materialistic world. When she painted, she believed that a higher consciousness was speaking through her. In her astonishing works she combines geometric shapes and symbols with ornamentation. Her multifaceted imagery strives to give insights into the different dimensions of existence, where microcosm and macrocosm reflect one another.
free-parking:

Paintings by Hilma af Klint (1862-1944)

Five years before Wassily Kandinsky (he of the book Concerning the Spiritual In Art, 1910), before Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich, before the images of Carl Jung and Rudolf Steiner—who dismissed her ideas as wrong—was this revolutionary artist and abstractionist, Hilma af Klint, possibly the first purely abstract painter to produced non-objective works in the early 1900s.
Hilma af Klint was influenced by contemporary spiritual movements, such as spiritism, theosophy and, later, anthroposophy. Her oeuvre builds on the awareness of a spiritual dimension of consciousness, an aspect that was being marginalised in an increasingly materialistic world. When she painted, she believed that a higher consciousness was speaking through her. In her astonishing works she combines geometric shapes and symbols with ornamentation. Her multifaceted imagery strives to give insights into the different dimensions of existence, where microcosm and macrocosm reflect one another.
free-parking:

Paintings by Hilma af Klint (1862-1944)

Five years before Wassily Kandinsky (he of the book Concerning the Spiritual In Art, 1910), before Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich, before the images of Carl Jung and Rudolf Steiner—who dismissed her ideas as wrong—was this revolutionary artist and abstractionist, Hilma af Klint, possibly the first purely abstract painter to produced non-objective works in the early 1900s.
Hilma af Klint was influenced by contemporary spiritual movements, such as spiritism, theosophy and, later, anthroposophy. Her oeuvre builds on the awareness of a spiritual dimension of consciousness, an aspect that was being marginalised in an increasingly materialistic world. When she painted, she believed that a higher consciousness was speaking through her. In her astonishing works she combines geometric shapes and symbols with ornamentation. Her multifaceted imagery strives to give insights into the different dimensions of existence, where microcosm and macrocosm reflect one another.
free-parking:

Paintings by Hilma af Klint (1862-1944)

Five years before Wassily Kandinsky (he of the book Concerning the Spiritual In Art, 1910), before Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich, before the images of Carl Jung and Rudolf Steiner—who dismissed her ideas as wrong—was this revolutionary artist and abstractionist, Hilma af Klint, possibly the first purely abstract painter to produced non-objective works in the early 1900s.
Hilma af Klint was influenced by contemporary spiritual movements, such as spiritism, theosophy and, later, anthroposophy. Her oeuvre builds on the awareness of a spiritual dimension of consciousness, an aspect that was being marginalised in an increasingly materialistic world. When she painted, she believed that a higher consciousness was speaking through her. In her astonishing works she combines geometric shapes and symbols with ornamentation. Her multifaceted imagery strives to give insights into the different dimensions of existence, where microcosm and macrocosm reflect one another.
free-parking:

Paintings by Hilma af Klint (1862-1944)

Five years before Wassily Kandinsky (he of the book Concerning the Spiritual In Art, 1910), before Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich, before the images of Carl Jung and Rudolf Steiner—who dismissed her ideas as wrong—was this revolutionary artist and abstractionist, Hilma af Klint, possibly the first purely abstract painter to produced non-objective works in the early 1900s.
Hilma af Klint was influenced by contemporary spiritual movements, such as spiritism, theosophy and, later, anthroposophy. Her oeuvre builds on the awareness of a spiritual dimension of consciousness, an aspect that was being marginalised in an increasingly materialistic world. When she painted, she believed that a higher consciousness was speaking through her. In her astonishing works she combines geometric shapes and symbols with ornamentation. Her multifaceted imagery strives to give insights into the different dimensions of existence, where microcosm and macrocosm reflect one another.
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pieceofmeimages:

Florence Tétier
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"A terrorist is called that only because he does not have the power of the State behind him – indeed, he has no State, which is why he is a terrorist. The State, at bottom, and when the chips are down, rules by means of a terror made legal."
James Baldwin on Palestine. (via vul-va)
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"Forgive the trees
for the way they can’t stop shaking
even after all these years of practice.
Forgive yourself
for the days you don’t even want to try."
Y.Z, a dying art (via rustyvoices)
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aestheticgoddess:

The Rose I-V, Cy Twombly 2008
aestheticgoddess:

The Rose I-V, Cy Twombly 2008
aestheticgoddess:

The Rose I-V, Cy Twombly 2008
aestheticgoddess:

The Rose I-V, Cy Twombly 2008
aestheticgoddess:

The Rose I-V, Cy Twombly 2008
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septagonstudios:

Emily Fundis ON TUMBLR